Remember when there used to be a trail over there …

Discussion in 'Free Zone' started by BeckTrex, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. BeckTrex

    BeckTrex Member

    Location:
    Yorba Linda, Ca
    Name:
    Mark
    Current Bike:
    2009 Giant Trance X3
    Google has updated their “Timelapse” project up to 2016. It lets you see a “Google Earth” view of any area as a time lapse from 1984 to present.

    This link will show how Santiago Oaks , Weir Canyon Wilderness Park and the surrounding neighborhoods have changed over the last 32 years

    https://earthengine.google.com/timelapse/#v=33.82265,-117.77642,11.973,latLng&t=3.14

    You can zoom and drag it to just about anywhere. It does not seem to like phone browsers , so you may need to use a desktop or laptop to see this.
     
  2. Mikie

    Mikie Admin/iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Lebec, California
    Name:
    Mikie Watson
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Hightower/Yeti 5C
    Whoa! Very cool!
     
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  3. mtnbikej

    mtnbikej J-Zilla

    Location:
    Orange
    Name:
    J M
    Current Bike:
    SC Chameleon SS, SC Hightower
    I only wish you could zoom in more.

    I remember when they started building the community across from Oaks up on Serrano.
     
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  4. Cornholio

    Cornholio iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    Salton Sea
    Name:
    Carol
    Me too, growing up in Villa Park those hills were our playground. We used to ride bikes up above Maybury Ranch with our BB guns in tow and played a lot of paintball up there too. I remember when Parkridge was built and the rest of those houses on Serrano followed shortly after, it was a bummer. :coffee:
     
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  5. Grassblade23

    Grassblade23 Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    Dan
    Current Bike:
    Iron Horse Quantum/Chumba XCL
    I remember as recently as 2009/2010 being able to drive into part of Peralta Hills, and under Serrano. When I left Cali in the '90s, noises were being made about connecting Canon and Imperial, (I was definitely guilty of turning on Loma to avoid freeways.) At some point when I came back in 2007, I realized that whole Serrano neighborhood was up there and that effectively connected Yorba Linda/Weir Canyon to Taft/Ball.
     
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  6. DangerDirtyD

    DangerDirtyD iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    CA
    Name:
    Chicken Nugget
    Current Bike:
    2013 Trek Slash 9
    Fear less, you lovers of undeveloped land...Senate Bill 743 to the rescue.
     
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  7. Grassblade23

    Grassblade23 Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    Dan
    Current Bike:
    Iron Horse Quantum/Chumba XCL
    I was going to ask you to elaborate, but decided to Google it myself.

    That didn't help any, so...care to elaborate? :unsure:
     
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  8. DangerDirtyD

    DangerDirtyD iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    CA
    Name:
    Chicken Nugget
    Current Bike:
    2013 Trek Slash 9
    SB743 will revise the way the California Environmental Quality Act is applied to discretionary projects (projects subject to review and approval by a State lead agency such as a city, the CPUC, the CDFW, even Caltrans). Under SB 743, the primary metric used to determine a discretionary project's impact to transportation, roadway circulation, and traffic will change from "Level of Service" to "vehicle miles traveled." Therefore, if a developer wants to build 2,000 new homes, phased or not, it won't matter (environmentally speaking) how many additional vehicles that project will add to an already congested intersection; instead, what will be considered an environmental impact requiring mitigation will be how many vehicle miles occupants/operators of that project will travel to live their lives (e.g., drive to/from work, to/from grocery store, run errands, etc.).

    This legislation in essence encourages infill developments amidst already built environments and will make it increasingly more costly and difficult to develop the outskirts of town. Undeveloped land will remain undeveloped for longer, while the Central Business Districts and surrounding urban areas will further densify.

    Build up, not out.

    A latent function of this legislation is reduced smog and greenhouse gas emissions as a result of fewer miles driven by motorists.

    Baseline conditions against which traffic engineers will establish thresholds to determine environmental impacts from excessive miles driven will be developed by each City (or County in unincorporated areas) based on "some" average number of miles still under consideration, and I expect each jurisdiction will adopt its own baseline.

    Examples of mitigation for impacts to the circulation network from excessive vehicle miles traveled include building in proximity to mass transit (train stations and bus routes) and grocery stores, incorporating mixed use retail components to residential developments, incorporating pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly infrastructure, payment of development impact fees for bike path/bike lane/mass transit improvements, carpooling incentives such as free parking and other subsidies for carpoolers (for commercial and industrial projects), incorporating a minimum number of electric vehicle charging stations, etc.

    Those who benefit the most are folks who can live without automobiles, especially those who can use, get ready for it, A BICYCLE to get groceries, go to work, and run other daily errands.
     
  9. Grassblade23

    Grassblade23 Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    Dan
    Current Bike:
    Iron Horse Quantum/Chumba XCL
    Thanks for the explanation.
     
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  10. Cisco Roots

    Cisco Roots Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Maple Valley WA
    Name:
    Cisco
    Current Bike:
    YT Jeffsy 29
    They, eh hm, WE, should have done this a long time ago. Then we would have more trails and wild places to enjoy. Glad something is being enacted though, better late than never. Thanks for the breakdown on it!
     
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  11. kioti

    kioti iMTB Rockstah

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Current Bike:
    ibis ripley
    The obvious downside to this theory is where we all get packed so tightly together we can barely breath and are then surrounded by off-limits private and/or no-access mitigation land. And this at a time when we're moving toward zero emissions vehicles? I prefer a quality of life approach, which to me blends various types of residential opportunities with adjacent open space for people to relax, unwind and recreate in. The proliferation of high-density housing units near shopping malls, such as Bella Terra in Huntington Beach, or the Spectrum in Irvine, might be fine for some people, but who's to say whether they'll work close by or not drive to three or four grocery stores in their quest for just the right butternut squash, mango chutney or porterhouse steak? And maybe the money these folks save on landscaping or commuting in their high-end ZEVs will go towards airfare to somewhere peaceful on the other side of the planet, which basically defeats the whole concept.
     
  12. DangerDirtyD

    DangerDirtyD iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    CA
    Name:
    Chicken Nugget
    Current Bike:
    2013 Trek Slash 9
    For those who work from home, or don’t (or barely) work, we salute you. Enjoy your rural residence adjacent to open space, but don’t forget your grocery list because it can be a long trip for just the right butternut squash, imported from Israel or New Zealand.
     
  13. tick

    tick Member

    Location:
    Orange
    Name:
    Tick
    Current Bike:
    Process 111
    In other words, my kids will never be able to afford a house in California.
     
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  14. DangerDirtyD

    DangerDirtyD iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    CA
    Name:
    Chicken Nugget
    Current Bike:
    2013 Trek Slash 9
    Possibly not, what with the Chinese cash offers for every product class. But there will be lots of bicycle parking at every warehouse in the IE in case they want to ride to work before loading up and driving a big rig across the State. :confused:
     
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  15. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Nice thread resurrection, DDD!

    A benefit of infill development should be less need to mitigate, provided they build over existing developments and not the few open spaces that remain in urban areas. In San Diego we continually get screwed as residential development expands outwards. Lots of areas have long-standing but unofficial trail networks, being private land. When land is sold to a developer or owned by a developer who decides to build, we lose not just the trails that are bulldozed for construction but also trails on whatever land is purchased as mitigation. Somehow these lands are often deemed "pristine" by wildlife agencies who sign off on mitigation but have never gone out to visit the properties, yet they have usually been subject to dumping, 4x4 activity, illegal encampments, and of course trails (moto, horse, hiker, and more recently, MTB). The big problem is that wildlife agencies do not view recreational use as compatible with conservation. Having cities focus more on redevelopment of urban areas rather than endless expansion of residential development into rural areas would also help preserve recreational opportunities.
     
  16. Grassblade23

    Grassblade23 Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    Dan
    Current Bike:
    Iron Horse Quantum/Chumba XCL
    This. IMBA's capitulation on that issue didn't help matters any, either.
     
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  17. Grassblade23

    Grassblade23 Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    Dan
    Current Bike:
    Iron Horse Quantum/Chumba XCL
    . odd double post
     
  18. BonsaiNut

    BonsaiNut Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Laguna Hills
    Name:
    Greg P
    Current Bike:
    XTR 29er (aka Frankenstein)
    Having lived in downtown Chicago for 8 years, city living can be vibrant and rewarding... particularly if you are one hour's drive away from cornfields and open land. LA is one big sprawl where you can drive for hours and still be in one big sprawl... and yet not a building higher than four stories to be seen.

    I worked in downtown LA - lots of space, in fact TONS of space for developing mid-rise or high-rise residential. However preservationists and "protectors of the homeless" block all the projects. Instead they believe that it would be better to force everyone to live in the coastal communities and commute in every day on the 10 freeway :(

    Even with illegal immigration, California is losing 100,000 residents per year to net domestic migration. With the recent state income tax increases, and changes in the Federal tax code, I expect that net migration number to increase. One wonders how we can be LOSING people, and still be short of housing? The answer's simple - the state / communities aren't allowing redevelopment. The only way you can economically justify $800,000 houses out in the desert past Victorville is because you aren't allowing people to build mid-rise housing in Westminster. Huge parts of the southland are undeveloped / under-developed - and you can't build market-priced housing because people want to keep their $350,000 bungalows in distressed parts of town.

    The population of Irvine has doubled in the 20 years I've lived here. When you look at all those mid-rise residential towers off the 405... imagine if instead of condos every unit was a single family home.
     
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