MTB giveth, and MTB taketh away.

Discussion in 'Health' started by buggravy, Nov 15, 2019.



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  1. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    I got the results of my MRI today, and it was basically what I feared but more or less expected. Fully torn ACL, and tibial plateau fracture. Fortunately no MCL tear, and the meniscus is in tact and looks good (which I hear may be a small miracle, given the TP fracture). Surgery is scheduled for 12/17. I am going for a second opinion on Monday, though that is more of a due diligence formality, and maybe a bit of surgeon shopping. I don't create a separate thread for the sake of attention, but more to create an information portal. I feel like I'm a borderline expert on shoulders after a couple surgeries, but knees are new territory for me. I imagine there is a wealth of experience and knowledge on the subject among members here. @DangerDirtyD has already been very helpful (and caring I might add), and I welcome any and all nuggets anyone else wants to share. Next order of business is for me to decide if I want to go with cadaver tissue for the graft, or an auto harvest. My surgeon gave a slight nudge towards harvesting my own tissue, due to a marginally better success/longevity rate at the expense of some increased discomfort in early recovery, but supposedly no increase in recovery time in terms of a return to activities. I'm guessing it might not be quite that cut and dry, but if so that does seem like kind of a no brainer.

    While surgery does seem like the obvious and prudent choice, the devil on my other shoulder is making some noise. After the injury I did some research, and reflected more on a hyper extension injury I had on my other knee snowboarding about 9 years ago, which I never had checked out. Without going into all the details, based on what I experienced then, and what I continue to experience in that knee (lingering instability and grinding, but no pain if I avoid movements I know to avoid), I would confidently bet that I tore that ACL as well. I do a lot of squats and deadlifts, that might help mask that by stabilizing around it. When mentioning that to my doc today he did some tests and said it does feel loose, and he wouldn't be surprised if it's torn based on what I described. Different injury for a different day, but in it's current state it's completely serviceable. All this said, I do feel like surgery for this new injury is the right call, but I should probably at least call myself out for giving some mental air time to that other voice.
     
    Oaken, ~JB~, kazlx and 13 others like this.
  2. DangerDirtyD

    DangerDirtyD iMTB Addict

    Location:
    CA
    Name:
    Chicken Nugget
    Current Bike:
    2018 Guerrilla Gravity SMASH
    My advice, get the surgery to spare incremental damage to your meniscus, as @mike has suggested. You are the client! Maybe ask for a BOGO offer to do both knees. Something to consider if you'll be incapacitated for a while anyway. With an autograft patella harvest, some docs try to put you back on your feet after a week or so, so the bedpan wont be an issue very long, especially since Percocet makes you constipated anyway. Getting off the toilet seat with two post-surgery leg braces can be a challenge.

    I joke because you have nothing to lose but time...and this joint does wonders for that. Fitness will return, and at least your bikes wont break or wear out while sitting idle for 6 months.

    Before your surgery, and as soon as you can pedal a bike again, go out and hammer as often as you can to build muscle and exorcize the bicycle demons as best you can.

    Also, consider becoming a designated iMTBtrails shuttle driver!
     
    ~JB~, kazlx, Cyclotourist and 13 others like this.
  3. Walleye

    Walleye Member

    Location:
    Vista
    Name:
    Bill P.
    Current Bike:
    Trek Fuel EX7
    My $.02: partially tore my RT ACL in 1995, was told by a surgeon to strengthen the surrounding musculature, & to quit the 'hard' sports like skiing & mtbing (!). Fast forward to 2005, where it completely tore (playing easy soccer w. kids). Had the surgery, using a bit of my patellar tendon, & never looked back! Skiing still stresses it (black diamonds + multiple days =no bueno), but mtb (linear stress) poses no problems. Good luck, & heal up soon!
     
  4. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Addict

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Harsh news Matt. Hope you can find something to fill you’re time during recovery.
    You’re in for a some hard days, but you’ll be back stronger in many ways!:thumbsup:
     
  5. Runs with Scissors

    Runs with Scissors iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    West Anaheim
    Name:
    Mark Whitaker
    Current Bike:
    2015 Giant XTC Advanced 1 29er
    @buggravy Hope it goes smoothly. You're still young, you'll bounce back in no time. :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    @mountaingirl sara - That is gonna be an awesome country-gospel refrain as soon as you finish writing the rest. :sneaky:
     
  6. mike

    mike iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    GG Smash
    What a gift, Matt! Miracle indeed – thanks for sharing that great news! (You might be thinking What great news, I have to have surgery...)

    What walleye said. Pedaling will be no issue. The sudden dismounts or even dabs would be the danger in MTB.

    If you’re keeping score, I had a patellar graft with zero issue. The bucket-handle tear in my meniscus was trimmed 17 years later. For the ACL job, I had epidural anesthesia, not general. If I can avoid general I will. Kind of fun watching the action, even with the knee view obstructed. The drilling into the leg bones...heavy duty!!!!
     
    Oaken, Cyclotourist, bvader and 10 others like this.
  7. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Addict

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    :laugh: I’ll work on it!
    Isn’t that the beauty of experiencing hardships though, you feel much more empathy for others.
     
    Oaken, Cyclotourist, Faust29 and 5 others like this.
  8. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Addict

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Heavy duty indeed!:eek:
     
    Cyclotourist, bvader, Faust29 and 4 others like this.
  9. mtnbikej

    mtnbikej J-Zilla

    Location:
    Orange
    Name:
    J M
    Current Bike:
    SC Chameleon SS, SC Hightower
    Sorry to hear this Matt....but, as you have already had experience with surgery with your shoulders, your knees are just as important.

    Sooner you go under the knife, the sooner you begin recovery and getting back to normal life. Good luck with it all.
     
    Cyclotourist, bvader, Faust29 and 5 others like this.
  10. BonsaiNut

    BonsaiNut iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    Laguna Hills
    Name:
    Greg P
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Hightower CC XX1
    I don't know what to say... so I'm gonna babble.

    The entire reason I got into mountain biking was my knees. I ran a lot in the military, and it turned into more major running when I worked for the parent company of Gatorade, and I used to run daily with hardcore fitness types. I ran the LA half marathon about a decade ago, and there is a nasty downhill stretch where suddenly, out of nowhere, I tweaked a knee and wondered (for the first time ever) if I was going to finish the race.

    Fast forward to today and I still run a couple times a week. However I run hills instead of flats, and dirt instead of pavement, and my knees thank me. And then I ride the climbs in MTB. To me the hills are the workout - the "no-diabetes" - the "no heart disease" - that you have to deal with at 50+. If you can do that and still be surrounded by nature - all the better.

    But if your knees are totally shot, if you can't bike a mile... take up camping. And if you don't know how / where to start with camping... shoot me a PM. I've got you covered :)
     
    Oaken, Cyclotourist, bvader and 6 others like this.
  11. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    I say this in the most loving way possible. I kind of dislike everything about this post. Seriously though, dabs and dismounts are my best tricks, and dabbing and dismounting to the right are my strongest. You’re taking away my mtb super power.
     
  12. mike

    mike iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    GG Smash
    Hehe, not to worry, bugBro. You just need a window of time to regenerate your Kryptonite. You’ll be back to your normal parkour moves once the mechanical work is completed. :)

    I still can’t get over your damn meniscus. There must be a gene for that!
     
  13. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Sorry to hear about the ACL Matt. I tore mine in very similar fashion March of last year. Riding slow around a barrier while exiting a trail system my handlebar caught on a piece of fence wire sticking out that I didn't see. It pulled the bar sideways and I put my right foot down just as the bike got hung up and I started to topple over. As that happened my knee hyperextended and there was a bit of a pop. I didn't think I'd torn anything as it wasn't unstable at all. Not like the first time I tore that same ACL 15 yrs ago. Sounds like you have plenty of surgery experience so this won't be anything new but I'll give a bit of info on each of my experiences in case any of it helps.

    First ACL tear was 2004. Huge pop when it happened and it was super painful. I had to crab-crawl down the steep trail we were on as my knee kept giving out from under me. Went to the ER where they told me its probably just a sprain, see your doc in 6 weeks if it isn't better. There was no swelling yet. Knee seemed better in 6-8 weeks so I didn't see a doctor, and by then was back riding. Every so often stepping backwards the knee would give out so I finally saw the doc 6 mos later for a referral. The surgeon he wanted me to see had a long wait list - turned out he was the NHL Canucks team surgeon. The delay was fine as I was back riding strong as ever. When I finally got in to see the surgeon it took him all of 20 sec to diagnose a torn ACL by manipulating the knee. No MRI. He gave me 3 options: 1) do nothing, you can strengthen it and it might be ok, but you risk blowing out the rest of the knee due to lack of stability. 2) Get a brace. This would provide around 50% stability but the ~$1k cost of the brace isn't covered by Canada healthcare. 3) Have surgery. Provides ~90% stability. Cost is 100% covered. I wanted it fixed so I took #3. I had my choice of surgery dates at that point, so I picked a date the following winter outside of riding season when I'd be busy at work. I wasn't told there was an option on tendon source. He used the hamstring. At the time the technique was drill a hole in the bone above & below the knee, stuff the tendon in each one and then shove a plug in there to hold it in place. Since it was physically attached the surgeon wasn't concerned about re-injury, the big thing was to get swelling down to regain range of motion. Honestly pain and impairment to mobility in the repaired knee are enough you won't notice any issue from the hamstring harvest. Went for a follow up 10-12 days later where the surgeon told me things looked great and no more need for crutches. He sent me to physical therapy, where I was put right back on crutches. No one really said anything about not biking, so as soon as I was comfortable pedaling I started riding lightly. First easy ride back on the north shore maybe 2 months post-surgery. But it was quite a few months before I was really comfortable or felt strong enough to ride hard. I don't think I rehabbed hard enough to fully regain strength. I finally started riding the bike around town a lot more which is when things really came back. It was probably a year before I felt like I was back to normal. Then no issues for the next 15 yrs.

    Fast forward to last year I tore it again. There was a small pop and it hurt, but I finished the ride and there didn't seem to be a loss of stability. So I was thinking maybe partial tear, strain or maybe MCL or meniscus. I could barely walk for a few days but once swelling went down it seemed good enough to ride. Went to see a surgeon about 10 days later and same thing 20sec on the table and he pronounced torn ACL. Had an MRI to confirm. I went through options with him in more detail. His normal recommendation is patellar tendon but he thought with repetitive motion of biking that could cause issues for me down the road. Couldn't use hamstring since that was used the first time. He was hesitant to use cadaver since that takes longer for the graft to fully heal (was told 9mos vs 4-5 for the other 2 options). He said techniques had changed a lot since my first ACL surgery and they now recognize there's a much greater risk of re-injury to grafts than they used to. It also seems like the graft method is different now. The arthroscopic photos he gave me after looks like both ends were pulled together and then tied in a bundle where they are left to graft together. (Going 2 yrs between injury and surgery the first time could have limited their options back then too.) He gave me a last option of using the hamstring from my good leg. After weighing options that's what I went with. Had surgery 5 weeks after injury. Was there at 630am, home by 10. They had me rent a CPM (continuous passive motion) machine to use starting immediately. Kept the leg moving a bit continuously. Only had pain the first 2-3 days then it was minimal - there was noticeable pain and discomfort from hamstring harvest in the good knee later when doing rehab exercises, but not terrible. First appt with physio was 4 days after surgery. By then I already had around 105* range. Was able to do full pedal strokes on the bike 9 days after surgery. Started riding around the hood a couple weeks later when I got my brace. Was told the biggest risk of re-injury was the 2-3 month period. Was finally cleared to ride dirt (with brace) after 4 months. Cleared for all activity with no brace after 7 months. I was feeling pretty good by that point, pretty much back to normal riding level. Sticking with rehab exercises definitely made a difference this time.

    Whether you do surgery or not is up to you. We can get by without ACL especially if you strengthen the leg but there is some risk of further injury. A brace helps. Demand a DonJoy brace - you'll probably have to pay for it yourself even with insurance. They are very compact and comfortable. The brace they got me is a different brand that is bulky and uncomfortable for more than a couple hours so I never wear it anymore. How much you'll be out of pocket on deductibles etc might play into your decision too. The fact its year-end and less deductible might remain could help. The ACL recovery isn't terrible. Likely 3-4 months off the trails but you can start riding pavement in about a month. I just focused on doing other stuff I'd normally not get around to since I'm always out biking. The time went pretty fast. Hit me up if you've got any questions.
     
    ~JB~, Cyclotourist, Stkx66 and 9 others like this.
  14. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    Funny, I just reread your original post, and while my response was obviously lighthearted, I read it completely wrong. You meant the meniscus was legitimately somewhat of a miracle, and the dabs, dismounts, etc., would be problematic if I forego surgery. I guess in between sets at the gym, with heavy metal blasting in my ears, is not the best time to read posts. Who knew.

    Seriously though, I'll count my blessings that the meniscus made it through unscathed. Probably worth the second opinion for that alone, to get a second set of eyes on the MRI to really verify that.
     
    Cyclotourist, mike, Faust29 and 5 others like this.
  15. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    Thank you for taking the time to lay this all out. I REALLY appreciate the perspective, and it helps me form expectations. The timelines the doc gave me were 8 months (could be 6, could be 10) for unrestricted activity, with mtb being pretty much the last thing that would get clearance. He said crutches probably only for a week or so, then the brace. Get it moving, and bearing weight (with a brace) as soon as possible, with PT starting in the first week. Probably good for a stationary bike in 3-4 weeks, and on a road bike in 3-4 months. Only reason he said I shouldn't return to a road bike earlier is the possibility, even if unlikely, of having to plant the bad leg.

    I'm pretty convinced, and really already was, that surgery is the way to go. I really shouldn't even be questioning it at this point.
     
  16. mtbMike

    mtbMike Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Oceanside
    Name:
    Mike
    Current Bike:
    Ibis HD5 & Intense Primer
    July 17, 2009....I broke a cardinal sin while riding dirt bikes in the Mammoth backcountry and took a jump blind that I expected was going to be a smooth down slope landing after maybe flying 15-20 feet. Well, the hill sloped away more than I thought and flew 50 feet and landed in a hole where somebody in a 4WD had probably got stuck the previously Winter. Long story short I tumbled and the bike can right behind me, landing on my left knee.

    I fractured the femur in two right above the knee which created a 2nd leg, tearing my ACL, MCL, LCL and destroying both meniscus. Femur was bolted back together with a SS plate and 7-9 screws (still there) the next day and everything was fixed but my ACL. The ACL surgery was November 10th and I did the harvest replacement method. I was cleared to ride dirt bikes again on April 1st. I was on a MTB hiatus for the most part since all I did was dirt bike from 2004-2009. Due to putting on 30 lbs while sidelined 8+ months (I was on the couch for 10-12 weeks due to femur break....aside from PT visits) so I started biking again the Summer of 2010.

    They tried to repair my meniscus' two times and they're trashed. MTB'ing doesn't bother me at all. It's sports with receptive pounding like jogging or snowboarding on hardpack that bother me...but they're doable.
     
    ~JB~, Cyclotourist, herzalot and 8 others like this.
  17. herzalot

    herzalot iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Chris
    Current Bike:
    2020 SC Megaplower
    :eek: :eek: :eek:

    Gnarly... and nasty.
     
  18. herzalot

    herzalot iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Chris
    Current Bike:
    2020 SC Megaplower
    Sorry to hear, but not unexpected.

    Have the surgery. You'll be snowboarding by spring.:thumbsup:

    I have a hunch how difficult it is going to be to go without your favorite activities so soon after your last hiatus. I would either become a horrible grouchy person, or maybe a much better person paying more attention to work and family - hard to say. Best wishes my friend. I will regale you with tales of my own triumphs and tragedies played out right here in the pages of IMTB. :cool:
     
  19. Faust29

    Faust29 iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    irgendwo
    Name:
    Stef
    Current Bike:
    3 SC is now 2 SC.
    I keep re-reading your post... It does suck, but as the others have said, you'll be back. Probably stronger and wiser than before. Hang around, don't become a stranger and keep us posted.

    And... Just out of curiosity... How many bikes and riders can you fit in that new German E-rocket? Maybe a side gig to keep you connected... :D
     
  20. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Glad I could help.

    FWIW with timelines, I increased my activity based on how I felt last year and not quite what I was approved to do. I was on the trainer at 10 days. Doing casual rides around the 'hood at 1 month. Riding easy dirt roads by about 2 months. A bit of easy singletrack at about 3 months. And still taking it easy but more singletrack by 4 months. Yeah there was some risk in doing that but I had my brace on at all times which would prevent hyper-extending the knee again, and that is what would cause re-injury. You gotta maintain your sanity, and sneaking out for a ride around the hood can be a good way to do that.
     
    Stkx66, Faust29, Cyclotourist and 5 others like this.
  21. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    Thanks, Chris. I imagine your hunch is correct. with the shoulder surgery recovery I knew it would suck, but I convinced myself that I would take the opportunity to grow mentally, emotionally, spiritually, etc. While that ultimately did happen on some level, it certainly wasn’t as fluid and pleasant as I had hoped. It really sucked, and I’m finding myself more salty on the front end than I was last time. Maybe that tempered expectation of personal growth will help me just embrace the suck, put my head down, and really focus on the other things I need to tend to.


    Agreed re: timelines. I do feel like I’m preconditioned to hit the early side of those timelines, and I’m sure that, within reason, I’ll be doing things a bit sooner than the doc wants me to mentally prepare for.
    Thanks, Steve. I’m sure I’ll be around. This place helped me maintain some sanity as I was recovering last time. That said, there was a pic last week (might have even been your pic) of @mtnbikej and @theprofessor taking a break on the trail with big smiles on their faces. There was something about that pic that just felt like a punch in the gnards (because it so perfectly captured the spirit of doing what we do with friends), though hopefully that was just the early rawness of the new diagnosis. I do like the idea of coming and hanging at trailheads on occasion. The new machine will transport 3 riders in wicked comfort, but currently doesn’t have a mechanism for affixing bikes to it. Happy to load people and rigs in the Taco though.
     
    Stkx66, Old&InTheWay, mike and 9 others like this.
  22. kazlx

    kazlx Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Tustin, CA
    Name:
    Joe
    Current Bike:
    Yeti SB5.5
    Sorry to hear man. ACL is tough. My best friend has had 5 separate surgeries for various reasons. Started in high school and pretty much ruined his basketball career. But he’s still pretty active and is able to play. He doesn’t mtb so no info on that. I’ve known a few people and following directions and rehab is key.
     
  23. Rumpled

    Rumpled Well-Known Member

    Location:
    OC
    Name:
    Jim Martin
    Current Bike:
    2018 Specialized Epic Carbon C
    I was like Mike above, I tore my ACL and had the autograft surgery of cutting out my own patellar tendon to replace my torn ACL.
    I was 30 at the time, not sure your age, but younger makes it easier. I was actually pretty happy to make it to 30 before tearing an ACL, most of my friends in sports did it way before then.
    My Doc was Harvard educated and well rated. My first exam with him he did that manipulation we've all seen done to a football player laying on the field. Grab the lower leg and try to push it in against the knee. My Doc had a bit of a grimace when he did that
    I said, "So, torn ACL, eh?" He said, "What makes you think that?". I responded that I saw his expression change
    So, he said yes. Then said he needed to do an MRI to confirm. I asked if he was ever wrong. He said no. So, we scheduled the surgery right then.
    Of course, insurance wouldn't pay before the MRI - but at least I was scheduled to cut the time down. Two weeks later, went under the knife/saw.
    As a biologist, I thought the surgery would be interesting. My Doc arranged the epidural. The anathesiologist was really cool. He arranged an extra TV so I could see everything. That drill looks like a tunnel boring machine like you've seen on Discovery digging the Chunnel. And the smell of your own bone being sawed/sawn? is not a good one. Somewhere between a saw burning wood and burning ants under a magnifying glass mixed with burning flesh.
    Also, quite early in the surgery I saw this little probe on the screen suddenly open up and cut out a big bucket handle meniscus tear. Reminded me of that spaceship eating another one in Moonraker.
    Friends who had had it done told me that the PT was really hard. To me, that wasn't too bad. It was just a bunch of workouts. What noone told me was how bad the first week post-op hurt. My procedure ended up with a piece of my patella cut out, that tendon cut down the middle and part of the tibia cut out. Then, the holes in the tibia and femur are 12 mm wide and 25 mm deep. (The drill is marked, it was pretty cool to watch)
    I was basically incapacitated for a week. After that, it was a lot of PT and workouts.
    I wasn't riding then, mostly running, swimming and playing basketball. Swimming happened about three weeks in, running about 4-5 months and basketball was 6+ months.
    A stationary bike was a big part of PT. About 2 1/2 weeks post-op I could do a full rotation. From then on, that was one of biggest things to do.
    When I was cleared to play basketball, the very first time, like 5 minutes in I came down wrong on someone else's leg. I heard a pop and felt it bad. I feared the worst, messing up my repaired ACL. My Dr had explained to me that most people start to feel really good about 3-4 months in with good PT. The problem is that the ACL like most ligaments has a pretty poor blood supply. He said the graft was weakest about 3-4 months post-op and not strong again until 6-7 months post-op.
    I followed this but that first hoops did me in. I didn't injure my ACL again, but tore the meniscus again. Had surgery on that (hey, Dr's need to pay for kids college, too) and my Dr said he left about 5-10% of my meniscus "but, essentially you've got nothing"
    On that score I've been lucky. I still run and have done a bunch of half marathons, all post-op. I just can't run hard three days in a row, so guess what - I don't.
    This was just my saga, hopefully yours goes well. Ask if you have any ?'s. Though I think I just said most of it.
     
    ~JB~, Stkx66, tick and 10 others like this.
  24. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Addict

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Wow, that was a good read, glad you’re healed up! I can’t even imagine watching my own surgery..before my surgery I YouTube’d the procedure.... I couldn’t even stomach that:sick:
    The part of this story that really caught my attention was the bit about you getting back to running! If I can trail run again I’ll be over the moon!!!
     
    Stkx66, mike, DangerDirtyD and 7 others like this.
  25. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    Had my 2nd opinion appt today, with the guy who will ultimately be doing the surgery. In reviewing my MRI he thinks there is a peripheral tear in the lateral meniscus, to be confirmed and repaired once they get in there. They also took more extensive x-rays and said there's some junk, probably bone shards and cartilage floating around in the knee that they'll clean out. He also put the exclamation mark on the previous diagnosis of full acl separation from the bone. New surgery date of 12/18. He also said at my age he recommends cadaver tissue for the graft, and I'm going to trust his expertise on this. For anyone rolling their eyes at me raising the possibility of a pre-surgery ride or two in the other thread, I won't be doing that. Surgeon said the best results come from operating on a knee with full range of motion (he actually wants me to to some pre-hab PT), and any irritation, much less further injury, could delay the surgery. So, the bike is hung for the foreseeable.
     
    Cyclotourist, Oaken, ~JB~ and 14 others like this.
  26. SnakeCharmer

    SnakeCharmer iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Crescenta Valley
    Name:
    Mike, aka "Ssnake"
    Current Bike:
    2018 Trek FEX
    I'm glad to hear that there is a solid plan for action now. Good going.
     
  27. herzalot

    herzalot iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Chris
    Current Bike:
    2020 SC Megaplower
    That sounds smart and promising!
     
  28. HBkites

    HBkites Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Huntington Beach
    Name:
    Sharone
    Current Bike:
    Why Cycles S7
    AS far as I know, both my ACL's are torn.

    My left one was blown way back in 1997 windsurfing, and my right was raptured around 2005 kitesurfing....

    After the initial pain and swelling. PT got me back on my feet. Cycling keeps my legs strong, and Snowboarding replaced skiing (two legs on the same board reduce the chance of knee injuries).
    The Dr who diagnosed the ACL rapture recommended skipping surgery if I can rehab to a point that would enable me "normal day to day usage". That's what I did, and I have no regrets.

    Every injury is different, and different injuries require different approaches.
    I'm not trying to change your mind, I just wouldn't recommend rushing it. Rest, rehab, and reevaluate in a few months.

    Good luck.
     
  29. buggravy

    buggravy Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Calabasas
    Name:
    Matt
    Current Bike:
    GG The Smash, Ibis DV9
    Believe me, this line of reasoning resonates and recurs. I am also fairly confident that my other ACL is toast from a snowboarding accident 8 or 9 years ago, which both of the surgeons said is a possibility based on their tests. That said, I think I'm mentally committed to surgery at this point. As much as the idea of 6-9 months out of commission sucks, if I waited 3-4 months only to find out I still need surgery extending things out to 1 year+ I think I'd really lose my sh!t. The term that the 2nd doc used to describe my current condition was complete ACL incompetence. That just sounds ominous, and both docs, in a pretty matter of fact way, said I'd be really foolish not to get it repaired.
     
  30. SnakeCharmer

    SnakeCharmer iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Crescenta Valley
    Name:
    Mike, aka "Ssnake"
    Current Bike:
    2018 Trek FEX
    Exactly. It's not worth the gamble. I too know someone who decided to live with a torn ACL. He is farther away from "perfect" than those I know who had the surgery done.
     



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