BB height and pedal strikes?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by scan, Jul 12, 2018.

  1. scan

    scan Well-Known Member

    Name:
    fran allas
    Current Bike:
    Scott Spark
    With bike geometry changing and the "lower/slacker" designs becoming more popular, have you guys experienced more pedal striking. I know in Mikie's recent Mcgill incident he mentioned pedal strike. I've noticed this on my latest bike , coming from a 26 to 27.5.
    Is it something people are getting used to or adjusting to? Thoughts??
     
  2. Sidewalk

    Sidewalk Well-Known Member

    Location:
    The road is where I call home
    Name:
    Josh
    Current Bike:
    N+1
    I rarely run into it as las a problem. I even got a longer crank (wrong one was ordered by mistake) for my Enduro, still don't have a problem. Most of my pedal strikes are in rock gardens or something, and I don't think BB height as much to do with that. I have a video if me destroying my last crank, BB height had nothing to do with the prdal strike.
     
  3. Voodoo Tom

    Voodoo Tom MTB Addict

    Location:
    Castaic
    Name:
    Tom
    Current Bike:
    Pick one, got a few
    Definitely have to be aware and get adjusted to the low BB thing. The Hightower (at least in 27.5+ mode) has a ridiculously low BB. Mine measures 12.6" and that's without suspension sag. Santa Cruz lists it as 13.25" or something like that but they are full of crap. With 29" wheels and the chip flipped mine still measures under 13".
     
  4. doublewide

    doublewide iMTB Rockstah

    Name:
    Mark
    Current Bike:
    Ride Life Ride Giant
    Sorry to say but the lower BB does increase your chances of pedal strikes. It's science.

    With the low BB's and long travel on a DH bike a 165mm crank is required. My Reign has 170mm cranks. @scan you'll learn to ride the lower BB bike in no time! Until then, time your pedal strokes, keep em level through the rough stuff, or just jump over the rock gardens!
     
    Mikie, Old&InTheWay, herzalot and 9 others like this.
  5. mike

    mike iMTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    I think you do get used to it and pay closer attention.
     
  6. Faust29

    Faust29 iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Rancho Santa Margarita
    Name:
    Steve
    Current Bike:
    Chameleon & Highball C
    I may need a few lessons on "jumping the rock gardens." :D :p :oops:

    Yeah... There was definitely an adjustment period going to the "longer, lower, slacker" school of mountain bike design. My beat up cranks are proof! SC says my Chameleon BB height is at 12.4". It's probably lower in real life measuring.

    After awhile, though, you get used to it... It wasn't an issue- even in the Utah chunk during True Grit.
     
  7. doublewide

    doublewide iMTB Rockstah

    Name:
    Mark
    Current Bike:
    Ride Life Ride Giant
    Just get on @mtnbikej 's wheel and learn!
     
    Mikie, Old&InTheWay, herzalot and 7 others like this.
  8. Sidewalk

    Sidewalk Well-Known Member

    Location:
    The road is where I call home
    Name:
    Josh
    Current Bike:
    N+1
    These are the kinds of pedal strikes I experience:


    Instagram Link
     
  9. Cyclotourist

    Cyclotourist iMTB Addict

    Location:
    Redlands
    Name:
    David
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Chameleon
    I've noticed it climbing through technical spots. Descending I just keep 'em flat and no big deal, but climbing you have to keep spinning, and so I'm whacking them a lot more. Haven't whacked one out yet, but I'm sure it could happen.
     
  10. scan

    scan Well-Known Member

    Name:
    fran allas
    Current Bike:
    Scott Spark
    Yes, that's the concerning part. Climbing with exposure on one side , then a pedal strike could push you toward the exposed side. :eek:
     
  11. HBkites

    HBkites Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Huntington Beach
    Name:
    Sharone
    Current Bike:
    Why Cycles S7
    Yes!

    Especially on my Ti bike when I'm using the 27.5+ wheels.
    That is something that dual wheels size bikes owner find out when then switch to the smaller wheels.
     
  12. Faust29

    Faust29 iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Rancho Santa Margarita
    Name:
    Steve
    Current Bike:
    Chameleon & Highball C
    I notice it a lot of more going down than up...
     
  13. Cyclotourist

    Cyclotourist iMTB Addict

    Location:
    Redlands
    Name:
    David
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Chameleon
    It's more of an annoyance than anything. As I'm going slow climbing, I can see them coming, and just know it's there. It doesn't buck me off the bike, but has stopped me and forced me to HAB at times (Happened like that today).
     
  14. knucklebuster

    knucklebuster Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mission Viejo (South Orange County)
    Name:
    Dave
    Current Bike:
    Canfield The One '12
    There are trade offs to a low BB, but the benefits are worth it imo. Low BB makes the bike noticeably feel more stable at speed and cornering. When I got my low BB bike a few years ago I was banging pedals all the time, but it was so much more confidence inspiring on the fast DHs. The BB on it is a little under 13 static, so 11ish at sag, and ~7 at full squish. cranks are 170 or a little less than 7 in....

    You do get used to it though, not start pedaling too soon before you're out of a corner and not leaning too much, timing the pedal strokes to miss rocks, and ratcheting through multi obstacle sections. There are some things you can do to the bike that can help. Shorter cranks, thin pedals, pushing up the compression on the shock to have it ride higher in the travel (or using climb switch). I particularly think that a high point of engagement hub makes a huge difference on being able to time and ratchet more effectively. I still get strikes occasionally but mostly because I got lazy in timing or ratcheting...
     
  15. Faust29

    Faust29 iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Rancho Santa Margarita
    Name:
    Steve
    Current Bike:
    Chameleon & Highball C
    Winners!

    There may be more pedal strikes, but I'll never go back to the high riding bottom bracket and 70+ degree head angle unless it's on pavement. I need the extra stability... :thumbsup:


    Edit: Also- the addition of the oval chainring up front has really changed climbing on the single speed, especially in chunky stuff. It's easier to ratchet, and get the cranks into position if need be. It's also much easier to get them spinning again. Zen Trail was the ultimate proof of this... With all the rock features and certain death on the right.
     
  16. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    I definitely get more pedal strikes on my Mojo3 than I did on the Mojo SL. I can get used to those. What I dislike more is that the Mojo3 is harder to pedal up gnarly technical climbs. Something about the geo makes it feel awkward, and I haven't gotten used to that yet. I can descend just fine on either bike. I'm not one who likes this never ending trend of longer/lower/slacker.
     
    Mikie, Old&InTheWay, Danmtchl and 6 others like this.
  17. mike

    mike iMTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    Big flat pedals, even thin ones, can elicit strikes by the unwary. I think most flats are a little too wide, but prolly better a pedal strike than a foot strike.
     
    Tom the Bomb, Mikie, Faust29 and 7 others like this.
  18. kioti

    kioti iMTB Rockstah

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Current Bike:
    ibis ripley
    I just checked my (Gen 1) Ripley and it's just under 13" to the bottom of the bottom bracket and I rarely get pedal strikes. My Tallboy was lower and I got them all the time. SC's website shows 12.99", but from the center of the BB to the ground. The Ripley feels planted and I appreciate the extra heigth, being an old dog and all..
     
    Mikie, Faust29, Old&InTheWay and 8 others like this.
  19. rossage

    rossage iMTB Addict

    Location:
    East Sacramento
    Name:
    Ross Lawson
    Current Bike:
    Highball
    Pedal strikes are part of the game. Happened with 26ers and it will happen with 36ers:cool:
    I consider avoiding pedal strikes an integral part of my riding. Timing the pedal stroke and even using fractions of back-stroke or quarter turns just to keep clear...
    A perfectly timed set will place the bottom of the pedal on the obstacle and a quick lift and you're over it. A pedal strike on purpose!
    That said, I ride XT trail pedals and the damn things are like rock hammers. The outside edges are gouged silver and even need to be filed once in a while. I've never opened them or adjusted them and they spin freely without wiggle. If you're going to pedal strike do it with these.
     
    Tom the Bomb, Mikie, Redman and 15 others like this.
  20. Grego

    Grego Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Fullerton
    Name:
    joe
    Current Bike:
    WFO9
    Should be called the Lowtower.:confused:
     
    Mikie, Danimal, DangerDirtyD and 11 others like this.
  21. SnakeCharmer

    SnakeCharmer iMTB Addict

    Location:
    Crescenta Valley
    Name:
    Mike, aka "Snake"
    Current Bike:
    Vassago/Trek
    Today’s low Geo/BB heights mixed with rear suspension compression is a recipe for regular pedal strikes, especially if you are rolling on wheels that are a smaller diameter than 29”.

    While I have a lot of fun going downhill on my Remedy 650b, its a beeotch to climb anything technical with because I hit the pedals/cranks all too often.

    Therefore, my next FS bike will definately be a 29er.
     
    Mikie, Cyclotourist, Faust29 and 5 others like this.
  22. kioti

    kioti iMTB Rockstah

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Current Bike:
    ibis ripley
    And the LowBoy? :whistling:
     
    Mikie, HBkites, Cyclotourist and 10 others like this.
  23. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Oh yeah, I have more pedal strikes on my SC than I can count....it’s definetly what caused my big crash. Now I’m hyper aware and it’s making me slower on the DH, but I don’t want to stack that hard again!:eek:
     
    bvader, Mikie, Cyclotourist and 6 others like this.
  24. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Right..this is a frustrating issue for me too!
     
    Mikie, Cyclotourist, Faust29 and 3 others like this.
  25. Racer X

    Racer X Member

    Location:
    Here
    Name:
    B
    Current Bike:
    GT Zaskar
    Most parts of riding is adapting. Either with the terrain or the equipment. I’m a slow rider and have always liked low bikes. My Explosif has a 12” BB height with 175mm cranks. I do like others have posted, pay attentions and time my pedal stokes. It just becomes natural.

    I used to have a Trance but it felt so tall. It sure was comfortable though.
     
    LLPoolJ, Danmtchl, Voodoo Tom and 8 others like this.
  26. mtnbikej

    mtnbikej J-Zilla

    Location:
    Orange
    Name:
    J
    Current Bike:
    SC Chameleon SS
    My TB2 had a low BB.....but mine was a little over forked...even then pedal strikes were an issue....until they weren't. I mean after a little bit of time, you just learned to time your pedaling through techy sections.

    Got my Hightower....50' into the first ride, had a pretty harsh introduction to the low BB. Again, I have adapted and it's no longer an issue.

    Pedal strikes still happen from time to time.....sometimes you just can't avoid them.
     
  27. herzalot

    herzalot iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Chris
    Current Bike:
    '15 Intense Tracer 275c DVOish
    Most of my pedal strikes come from pedaling out of turns. I should stop doing that - except accelerating out of turns is what we do in cars and on motorcycles. It's the right thing to do.

    My worst crash to date was most likely a pedal strike. There was forensic evidence of such (fresh scratch on left pedal/crank arm combined with fresh hole in the left side of my face and a dislocated left shoulder). I don't remember the crash - or the next four hours. Still don't. Perhaps I simply lost the front end on a slight turn, but I am going with pedal strike. Knolly Endorphin 26er. 175mm cranks. Shimano XT Trail pedals. Transition to slight uphill, on a slight left turn.

    Suspension set up and seat height make a huge difference in DH pedal strikes. Railing turns with soft suspension and a low seat will put your BB very, very close to the ground when you step on the gas. How does a low seat do anything you ask? Because you get more weight over your cranks.
     
    Danmtchl, Mikie, Faust29 and 9 others like this.
  28. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Oh crap, I never thought about the seat height adding to the PS issue! Hmmmm:thumbsdown:
     
  29. Mikie

    Mikie Admin/iMTB Hooligan

    Location:
    Lebec, California
    Name:
    Mikie Watson
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Hightower/Yeti 5C
    All I can tell you is my Hightower has more pedal strike per mile than any other bike I have owned. I have increased ratchet capability, and I time more than ever my pedal strokes when I’m consciously aware of technical that can make contact. It’s those moments when you don’t see it coming that can bite yah. Something to be aware of when the conditions are right.
    For me it was...
    Weight slightly too far forward, a slightly arching slightly downward left turn, light in the Pedals with equal pressure, pulling up on the back side and pressure on the front at speed, inside peddle dropping to increase velocity, and right at Crank Arm 4:00 o’clock.... bam!
    I’m going to call it the pole volting affect. Both wheels off the ground, rear end swinging wide, body leading the charge.
    It would have been awesome if there wasn’t an FN tree in the way to catch my fall.
    I would say you should have grave concerns for pedal strike, and really take the time to gain PS avoidance techniques as the lower and slacker is pretty popular right now.
    Apparently I have not mastered mine.
     
  30. mountaingirl sara

    mountaingirl sara iMTB Rockstah

    Location:
    So Cal
    Name:
    Sara Ford
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz 5010
    Like you said, it gets you when you’re unaware...I’m SUPER watchful since my crash, but I’ve had it happen a few times since then! PS is almost all I thought about when I rode at Skypark, it never did happen thank God!
    How are ya doing Mikie??
     
Loading...