Bag system overload

Discussion in 'Bikepacking' started by mike, Mar 11, 2017.

  1. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    JPaks is killing it!

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    I thought I was on the cutting edge when I drew this up... :speechless:
    czar-bags.jpg
    Eliminating the front roll is my goal. I'll use a backpack and small seat bag with this, and have capacity for anything in the lower 48 outside of winter. :thumbsup:
     
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  2. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    What's so bad about the front roll? I'd like a smaller one but I don't find them to be that cumbersome. I'd change to one of the new seat bags that works with a dropper post. All that goes in my front roll is sleeping bag and pad, which is some volume but not much weight.

    You'd need to make sure the piece below the downtube does not contact the front wheel when the fork compresses. Unfortunately I don't think my front triangle is large enough to make a frame bag really worth while.
     
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  3. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    Nothing really horrible about a front bag, just looking for a better way to put stuff on my bike and have it perform optimally.

    A front harness with a small or large drybag is a great setup, but it blocks some view and wobbles some no matter what, often doesn't play nice with cables and hoses.
     
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  4. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    True it moves some. I've been using an OR compression sack, slightly compressed, attached with 2 rei nylon straps to the handlebar. Then I put a 3rd narrower one around and through the front triangle and cinch that one down. It does pretty well to keep it stable. The cables/hoses just get scrunched up a bit but it doesn't seem to cause any issues. I use a cutout from a tyvek lumber wrapper for a ground sheet which gets folded up and partially wrapped around the outside of the compression sack which prevents any gnar from cables or head tube on the bag.
     
  5. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    All great input from someone who has been there plenty, thanks, ev.

    I've retro-ed my harness setup to minimize movement, but it is what it is. Constructive discontent get a bit unruly sometimes...

    Ultimately, it's probably a bit dicey to invest in such an elaborate setup unlikely to be useful on another frame. I should prolly suck it up and repurpose one of the frame bags from our tandem – again! Modularity is good. :cool:
     
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  6. SnakeCharmer

    SnakeCharmer MTB Addict

    Location:
    Crescenta Valley
    Name:
    Mike, aka "Snake"
    Current Bike:
    Salsa/Trek/Kona
    Are you sure that there is a bike under there somewhere? ;)

    I think my SJ HT would look lovely dressed up in that attire and I am quite sure that her owner would be very happy to use it. :cool:
     
  7. kioti

    kioti MTB Addict

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Current Bike:
    ibis ripley
    And if you run out of pockets you can wear one of these:

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  8. mtnbikej

    mtnbikej J-Zilla

    Location:
    Orange
    Name:
    J
    Current Bike:
    SC Chameleon SS
    That's a whole lotta junk in the trunk......and in the hood....and in the cab. :eek:
     
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  9. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    Seriously then...

    Better than any bag system, just pare down your kit. My last bikepack was the lightest kit I've used for something over a few days, and it worked swimmingly for 40 days at summer/fall elevations up to 12k'. I got loads of comments about how light I was traveling...but I still had a real tent and and a stove. Light is right, speed is safety, yadayada.

    I can't help thinking about how that F-R-centered weight on the bike would ride dreamily. Meanwhile, in the real world...
     
  10. CarlS

    CarlS Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Temecula, CA
    Name:
    Carl
    Current Bike:
    Walmart $50 special
    I'm also thinking of getting a frame bag from him. I would like to see what you can put in the 2nd velcro-ed on bag. Is it strong enough for water? Or would it pull the velcro apart. Man, if you get a custom design a large water bladder or bottles that fit in that 2nd bag under the downtube.... opens up so much room in the main triangle. I need to do some more long rides on the full rigid carbon bike before I commit to buying one.
     
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  11. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    Awesome...Joe seems like a solid pro.
    Underneath sounds like a great place for the weight. I would be more concerned about seams ripping than the velcro pulling, but I think it could work. Maybe a Drom-Lite bag as ghetto custom bladder? The new caps are much improved.

    Ultimately I bailed on the front-roll-elimination project with Joe. I realized that with a bigger seat pack (Viscacha) and some anything bags in place of those dinky mountain feed bags, I can get everything off my bar front and fork. (With a pack, because I prefer to wear one.) The obsolescence when you get a new bike was repelling. Also fearing that if I had much more capacity, I would find stuff to fill it with.

    The frame bags from our tandem have come in handy...this will be the fourth bike they've been on. The two small ones from a Ventana ECDM or Fandango frame can work great for single bikes, if imperfect.
     
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  12. Cyclotourist

    Cyclotourist MTB Addict

    Location:
    Redlands
    Name:
    David
    Current Bike:
    Santa Cruz Chameleon
    The e-bike battery fits in there nicely! ;)
     
  13. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    If you want some extra water storage below the downtube you could try one of these from Bedrock bags - http://www.bedrockbags.com/gear/honaker-bot-bag

    I have one, it works pretty well. Ditch the nalgene in favor of a lighter bottle though....
     
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  14. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Location:
    Western US
    Name:
    Mike O
    Current Bike:
    Guerrilla Gravity Smash
    Cool option, evdog.

    No hard cylinder can compare to flexible water storage (bladder, Platypus, Dromedary), though. It's just not a very efficient shape for the job, with its weight too far from the attachment point and a shape designed to wobble.

    I used to fill my 10,000 ci haul bag 65% full with water bottles for a week on a climb. With flexible storage it went down to 25% or less. So yea, I have issues with cylinders. I used platypus bottles on every muti-day bikepack I've done since 2007. They are somewhat fragile if they're not new, and they can be split open by dropping on a sharp object, but it's still my first choice. Every broken or leaking Platy I've ever sent to Cascade Designs has been replaced. When I get rich I'll try a Drom-Lite. The regular Dromedary bags are absolutely indestructible; that cap is improved, and we complained so much about the taste that they figured out how to make em not taste like garden hose (MSR actually offered a trade-in to my bro when he inquired). I carry one bike bottle because it works well with my prefilter and Steripen. YMMV...
     
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