TR - Bikepacking the Kaibab Plateau

Discussion in 'Ride Reports' started by evdog, Jun 20, 2016.


  1. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Reading many years of awesome TRs for the North Rim led to a return trip over Memorial Day weekend to do some bikepacking. Years ago I rode the Rainbow Rim trail but have never checked out any of the Arizona Trail segments up there. Its not an easy place to get to from SoCal and there are many other choice destinations closer to home.

    I have to give a lot of credit to Freeskier and other AZ bikepacking pioneers for the route I took. I combined two routes he rode over the last couple years into one that would hit all the singletrack segments I wanted to check out. Perhaps the extra credit was ambitious given my lack of recent riding, but being on my own I could modify the route at will. I was really looking forward to just immersing myself in the route and having nothing to do for 4 days but pedal.

    Not being able to get out of work very early on Friday, I missed my window to beat the worst of LA/Vegas traffic. Instead I opted to take the longer but stress free drive through Phoenix and Flag. It is awesome having that option for long weekends as there is always somewhere in AZ that is prime riding conditions, right now.



    After a late arrival I was at the northern AZT terminus at Stateline Campground at 7am ready to roll. Some through hikers arrived, finishing their 750 mile walk from Mexico. That was pretty cool to see...

    DSC08414_zpsuixzxqak.jpg


    First up was 13 miles steady climbing on House Rock Valley Rd, which I drove in on the previous night. It was pretty easy climbing as far as dirt roads go.

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    Time to do some hiking

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    You never know what you'll find scouring topo maps and Freeskier found a cool trail, the Navajo Trail, that connected over this ridgeline to the AZT and beyond to some other dirt roads

    IMG_2256_zps7xlw134y.jpg


    It is far from being the easier option but I will never turn down singletrack if given the choice. A 700ft hike a bike was a nice break from the dirt road, til the elevation and heat started getting to me.

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    Almost at the top

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    The climb was slow because the trail was steep and hard to follow in places. Get slightly off track and you couldn't even see the trail until you zig-zagged across it or spotted a random cairn.

    Once up top, the trail became just an open corridor for the most part. It was not overgrown at all, but there was seldom an obvious trail tread because of the total lack of traffic. After topping out it was pretty much all rideable.

    DSC08440_zpsigtlzdsd.jpg


    There were occasional trail signs but in a number of open areas I had to rely on the GPS to keep me on route. You may survive without one but you'd better love trial and error.

    DSC08442_zpsbxj31p65.jpg


    The end of the Navajo Trail for me. As much as I wanted to check out the rest of it, I still had plenty of miles to go and didn't need any bonus climbing. Navajo continues another 6 miles including a 1200ft drop off the plateau.

    DSC08458_zpscvazqt89.jpg


    Instead, I turned south on Forest Rd 248 which would take me right to Hwy 89 near Jacob Lake.

    DSC08460_zpsugnh4fi1.jpg


    FR248 started off as doubletrack and slowly improved the more I climbed. Despite easy climbing I soon started feeling the first twinge of cramps. I couldn't remember the last time I had cramps after just 20 miles. I slowed down, drank more and made it into Jacob Lake around 230pm mostly unscathed.

    DSC08462_zpsg7zd9xbl.jpg


    Jacob Lake was a planned lunch stop and resupply, and I took a long rest to hopefully ditch the cramps. The toughest choice on the day was what do I hate more, cramps or pickles. Answer: cramps. Second question - can ketchup save the day? Answer: No!

    IMG_2262_zpsirviu2rg.jpg


    The pickles and a couple hours of hydration worked and I had no more issues with cramps. I normally don't drink a lot on rides which was part of the problem. I did not want a repeat of that in the middle of nowhere so I bulked up with 250oz water, considering the next water source is 65 miles away. I also carried 2 days food in case I decided to skip the Grand Canyon village.

    I wasn't on a schedule but was getting antzy to get moving because I'd have to make up any miles I didn't finish today. I left Jacob Lake around 530 still hoping to make it to the Rainbow Rim trailhead, that night 40+ miles away. That would be pushing it given the long break. Bring on the night riding!


    A few last cool views before dark and the start of the climbing:

    DSC08466_zps9jwyrs69.jpg

    DSC08467_zpsbtcixzky.jpg


    With some fast rolling forest road and a 2k foot descent, I covered 20 miles by dark. Around 9pm I suddenly had some major lightning strikes ahead, in the general direction I was heading. I stopped and had some food, watching the clouds to figure out if the storm was moving away or toward me. I had brought no rain gear as the forecast was 100% clear, so I needed to have some tree cover in case of rain. The clouds were moving favorably and within half hour the electrical storm blew over, so I kept going.


    Temps were perfect and I was still feeling good. After the low point around 6,200ft I needed to climb back up to 8,000. Most of it wasn't bad, but the final climb would be a lot steeper on a more primitive road. I was ready to stop for the day but I turned into a frigid cold air drainage as I was looking for a campsite. No way was I camping there, I had to put on all my layers to keep warm despite the effort to climb. I finally made the top around midnight and had my choice of spots.

    Another 16 miles after dark put me at around 68 on the day, and just 6 miles more of flat/downhill riding to the RR trailhead. I was pretty happy with that, and slept very well.
     
  2. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Day 2

    It would have been awesome to wake up along the canyon rim, but this campsite worked perfect, and it's not like I would be hanging out for long. I was rolling by 7am

    DSC08468_zpsh7kob7b0.jpg


    I held off on breakfast til I hit the rim, thankfully it was a pretty quick ride to get there. Perfect, gorgeous morning too.

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    Self timer selfie

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    Bike shot fail

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    Rock out...

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    I started seeing a few people as I got near Fence Pt, and then a lot of people. The rest of the trail all the way past Timp Pt was a total zoo. Not a big deal, it was just a shock after seeing almost no one on the roads or trails that morning or the whole first day.

    DSC08509_zps29gpycsa.jpg


    Most of the trail is good, some parts are what buff singletrack dreams are made of.

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    Probably the best view from the trail = great spot for a lunch break

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    The Forest Service is building a new extension to the RR Trail (see map http://a123.g.akamai.net/7/123/1155...ai.com/11558/www/nepa/78359_FSPLT2_058136.pdf) and I rode the first mile or so of that. Then it was back on fire roads the rest of the day.

    DSC08532_zpspl2bj2mp.jpg



    My stretch goal for the day was to make it to the Grand Canyon Village. However, I also wanted to stop in and check out Point Sublime. My progress on the day would determine if that was worth it, as it is 6 miles off route and only worth it prior to sunset.


    There were some nice sections of road to get there.

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    The National Park boundary arrived a lot sooner than expected

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    I ran into one park employee in a truck plus a couple side by sides in the afternoon. I saw no one else until Point Sublime

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    It is mostly downhill from the turnoff to the Point. This was good for making it by sunset, but bad for getting back on route.

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    Point Sublime has one of the best views I've seen of the canyon

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    You even get a short glimpse of river

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    It would have been nice to see it in full daylight but the sunset was nothing to complain about

    One of these times I need to come back and camp at Pt Sublime. The few people who were there all left at dusk so it would be pretty quiet.

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    I had dinner at the Point and then packed up at dusk and got back on the road. The climb back up to the turnoff was steady and not terrible. Past the turnoff the road seemed to alternate between cold air drainages and climbs up along steep side hills. I was getting ready to call it a night for but wasn't seeing any good camping spots. Finally after topping out at the high point I found a nice flat area next to the road. It was much warmer as well.

    My mileage for the day was right around 60, and while I didn't make the village I was set up for a quick run in there in the morning. I slept well again.
     
  3. ridinrox

    ridinrox MTB Addict

    Location:
    Murrieta
    Name:
    Roxanne
    Current Bike:
    '11 Turner 5-Spot
    Incredible, impressive, in awe ... :thumbsup:
     
  4. kioti

    kioti Well-Known Member

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Great riding and well-earned views. I love that you were bushwhacking on Day #1. Looks like good timing season-wise as well.. lots of green!

    Is there more to come, or did Spock beam you back to your rig?
     
  5. dstepper

    dstepper Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Dean Stepper
    Current Bike:
    2014 Turner Czar
    I will be out there 3rd week July will be following some of your routes...thxs Evan.
    Been a while since we hung out.

    Dean
     
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  6. Cougar

    Cougar MTB Addict

    Location:
    Laguna Niguel
    Name:
    Craig
    Current Bike:
    '14 Turner Burner
    I'm not sure that bikepacking is my thing, but reading reports like this has my jaw dropped in awe. Great stuff!
     
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  7. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Name:
    Mike O
    Way to mine the goods, Evan. Congrats on a nice route. TFPU!!!
     
    Mikie likes this.
  8. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Thanks guys!

    Yes, more to come. It would have been nice if spock could have beamed me back to my bed at home, but that goes against the whole self supported concept of bikepacking

    You never know. If you like camping and bike riding, it could be for you. You don't need to ride long distances, the beauty of bikepacking is it gives you tons of freedom and the ability to do routes you never could otherwise. It also changes your thinking about rides. I normally avoid fire roads as much as possible, but if they link together a cool route like this then I have no problem with it.
     
  9. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Day 3

    I should say...I slept well, except for getting dive bombed by mosquitos all night...WTF, at 8400ft???

    Again, I planned to hold out for a breakfast burrito at the Grand Canyon Village and was up early, rolling around 6am. The downside to the early start was freezing temps dropping down some drainages. All my layers on including knit cap under my helmet and cold weather gloves and I was still freezing. I barely warmed up enough on the climbs to recover for the next downhill.


    Proof of snow. The only white stuff I saw the whole trip. Unless you count frost I saw in some of the meadows.

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    By 730 it warmed up and I removed most layers.

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    One last climb to warm me up

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    I rolled into the GC village around 9am. Wow, busy - tourists everywhere kitted out in their finest new hiking apparel.

    The deli was closed until 10 so I headed to the Roughrider Saloon which serves breakfast burritos in addition to the token breakfast muffin fare. I had to wait as they were out of burritos. While I waited a joking inquiry led to the discovery that yes they can serve cold refreshing beverages at this hour. The burritos were not as large as I hoped so I loaded up on 2 more to eat later.


    Beer for breakfast, because it is past noon somewhere...

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    I wandered over to the back side of the Grand Canyon Lodge to check out the view. Wish I had taken my burrito over there as they have rows of chairs to lounge in

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    The main trail through the park is open to bikes. I saw no one else on it, everyone was too busy driving the mile from the campground to the village. It's nothing special but has a nice grade and hey, its trail in a National Park that we're allowed to ride! How progressive...

    DSC08578_zpsya2hm3pp.jpg


    I made my way back to the North Kaibab Trailhead, where that trail (also designated the Arizona Tr) climbs out of the ditch. Across the road it continues from there north, bikes are allowed. This has been a grey area as park plans haven't shown bikes as officially allowed, but signage and some maps do show bikes as allowed. A park plan update now underway is proposing to make bike access on AZT north of the rim official, as well as on a couple other routes in the park. Hopefully this trend continues and the parks start to allow bikes in more places.


    After a short fire road section the real singletrack begins, with a lot of climbing. After a few miles it transitions into a utility corridor and has plenty of downed trees. This combo makes the section not much worth riding. I moved 15-20 smaller trees off the trail, but tons will need a chainsaw.


    Typical section before it turns into full utility corridor

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    There were nine miles of this to get to the North Rim entrance station. Then another 4-mile dirt road climb up to a fire lookout. Skies were dark by this point and threatening rain so I considered skipping the lookout. In the end I made the short detour and climbed the stairs.

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    I was glad I did. On the way up it started to snow! Then it turned to horizontal rain.

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    The cabin proved a convenient place to hole up for a while and gather my thoughts. Interesting graffiti inside. Abbey, apparently, manned the lookout tower for years and lived in this cabin.

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    View out the window

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    The day had gone a lot slower than expected thus far and it was now 3pm. With a 10 hour drive home waiting at the end of the trip I needed day 4 to be a short one, which meant a lot more miles of AZT today or possibly bailing on part of the ride. It sucks when you have just reached the section of trail you've been looking forward to most and have to consider bailing on some of it. As the rain continued self doubt creeped in and I was not liking my chances of getting far enough. There was 4.5 hours daylight left and 40 miles to Hwy 89. I needed to get close to there as the 27 miles from 89 to Stateline is said to take 6 hours. Not much I could do but refuel as I waited out the rain. After a few false stops it finally slowed, and I got going.


    This next section of AZT is well known for gorgeous high altitude meadow riding.

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    But not on this day. I had hide out under trees a couple times as rain squalls passed through. The additional delays were not helping my concern over making distance

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    Soon enough though skies started to lighten up a bit and I was turning over some miles and getting into the rhythm - ride through meadow, hike a bike over ridge, descend, climb over downed tree, repeat.

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    There seemed to be a downed tree every time I picked up momentum. Not a huge number of them, but enough to be noticeable.


    I also saw my first Kaibab squirrel. They are distinct with white tails and long pointy ears, and seemed more skittish (and harder to photograph) than regular squirrels.

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    The trail got better and better as I continued on, with a few nice aspen sections. And another downed tree every 5-10 mins.

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    Eventually I got to the East Rim viewpoint. A trail drops down toward threatening clouds, but I continued on to the AZT.

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    More meadows. For awhile it looked like the storm behind this hill was going to pummel me, but as the meadow turned the clouds seemed to change directions and faded back for the last time.

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    I still had more ridgelines to climb over as the meadow-HAB pattern continued. None of the climbs were long and they broke up the pace well so that I never got tired.

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    Getting close to sunset I came across this meadow with a small pond and some deer. One more 10 minute HAB followed, and at the top I stopped for my dinner burrito and got ready for night mode.

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    Last light

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    Beyond that high point the trail lead into a burn area and then an old road bed for a dozen+ miles of flat to gradual descent. The riding was just ok, and I doubt the views would be great so riding it at night was fine with me. It seemed to go on and on, and I figured if I could make it past the final HAB on the elevation profile I'd be in good shape for tomorrow. There were no big climbs after that so with a decent start time I should be fine.

    The trail dropped into a final ravine before the HAB that was absolutely freezing cold. Climbing out of it I didn't find the tree cover I'd hoped for to provide wind protection but it was warm enough I just found a flat spot off the trail and crashed. At 50 miles I did well on the day considering the downed trees and rain delays. No mosquitos because of the breeze was a bonus.
     
  10. StrandLeper

    StrandLeper MTB Addict

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Timothy M. Ryan
    Current Bike:
    SC Bronson 1x/Pivot 429 1x xtr
    Unreal. Great ride. Great report. Thx for sharing.
     
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  11. herzalot

    herzalot MTB Addict

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Chris
    Current Bike:
    2015 Intense Tracer 275c DVO
    Abbey would be Edward Abbey - but you probably knew that.

    Words fail me to describe my reaction to your ride report. Respect for your effort, commitment and diligence. Slack-jawed amazement at the scenery (which cannot truly be captured by a photograph). Thank you for posting and congrats on a ride well done.

    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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  12. ridinrox

    ridinrox MTB Addict

    Location:
    Murrieta
    Name:
    Roxanne
    Current Bike:
    '11 Turner 5-Spot
    It's like reading a story book. TFPUx100
     
    Mikie likes this.
  13. kioti

    kioti Well-Known Member

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    Thanks Evan! That 2nd half was worth waiting for and a revelation. The canyon views were outstanding and the meadows looked peaceful.

    I was surprised you didn't take rain gear, but holing up and dodging rain drops actually seemed to put you more into the environment, as opposed to barging through it.

    You've definitely stirred up something here, and no doubt inspired many of us by sharing this trip.
     
  14. Cyclotourist

    Cyclotourist MTB Addict

    Location:
    Redlands
    Name:
    David
    Current Bike:
    Gunnar Rockhound 29
    Beer for breakfast is a good motto! THANKS for posting the write ups... inspiring!
     
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  15. BigSchill

    BigSchill New Member

    Location:
    Carlsbad Ca
    Name:
    Michael Schiller
    super nice report Evan. I'd love to get out there sometime. Is now the best time to go or later in the summer?

    mike
     
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  16. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Day 4...final chapter!


    The half-packed up campsite, and water boiling for breakfast. The distant ridgeline is what I rode along the night before

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    The old roadbed continued on for a couple more miles before finally climbing into tree cover

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    The road bed wasn't bad but there is no substitute for purpose made singletrack in the trees. The AZT here is the kind of riding I came here for

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    The trail was awesome for a few miles. Then it transitioned to double track, which was also awesome, as far as doubletrack goes

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    It took around 90min to hit Hwy 89, so I was a bit behind but on track to finish at a decent time.

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    As I continued on the trail slowly transitioned from pine forest to scrub brush

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    After a while I arrived at a meadow similar to the one I passed through on Day 1.

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    Hard to see in the first pic but you can make out the cliffs far to the north

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    AZT = Trail 101 = North Kaibab Trail

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    I started to see more flowers than anywhere else on the route so far. It seemed the higher elevations, while snow free, were still waking up from winter - still brown and barren

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    The trail continued its transition to Juniper and sage brush

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    And some cactus...

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    Mostly it was nice trail, a bit raw due to minimal traffic but some nice tech sections to break up the rolling terrain. And a few short HABs as the trail crossed some drainages

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    Getting more Utah-like

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    After crossing some drainages the trail finally started to follow one downhill

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    This dumped me out onto a ridgeline above the final switchback descent to Stateline

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    It was no Grand Canyon, but the views did not suck

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    Final descent. I'd call this day's ride a win, pretty nice trail for the most part and a great variety of terrain and scenery from start to finish. It dropped around 3500ft over 37 miles, mostly in 3 main descents, so it is definitely xc riding.

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    The horrible moment when you get back to the truck to find your soda exploded and your last two beers leaking bubbles.

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    Fortunately the salvage operation was successful, and after cleaning up I was on the way home. This sign makes more sense for those who reach the campground via the AZT:

    DSC08731_zpsxjx64qei.jpg


    Kinda sketch way to ride. But the dog was stoked, ears dancing in the wind.

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    I made it home pretty late but the long hours driving and riding were well worth it. I covered a lot of nice terrain, rode some amazing trail segments, and saw a ton of cool stuff. Nothing like some long days riding your stress away....
     
  17. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Name:
    Mike O
    Thanks for the great pix, prose and stoke, evdog. The avatar is killer, too : )

    This is one of those reports that inspires, entertains and becomes great fodder for reserch...well done on all fronts :thumbsup:
     
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  18. Cougar

    Cougar MTB Addict

    Location:
    Laguna Niguel
    Name:
    Craig
    Current Bike:
    '14 Turner Burner
    +1 for not sucking.

    I'd love to see a traced map of your route (or gasp Strava rides), as I'm 100% not familiar with that area. Again, bikepacking isn't my thing, but I like looking (my wife says that's okay)!
     
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  19. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Thanks guys! Nice to know people still appreciate a full trip report. I always hope what I post inspires others to write them, as I sure love reading them

    I do now...thanks to google!

    In retrospect I should have taken my shell jacket as a layer in place of something else, but things turned out ok. Bikepacking can involve a lot of tradeoffs because you can only carry so much stuff. And often, you want to carry as little as possible. I ditched the rain gear and took just a light emergency bivy so I could carry more water. Forecast looked clear so I rolled the dice. I would not have chanced it in Colorado but AZ weather is usually more stable before monsoon season.

    It could have been a lot worse. A friend of mine rode into Jacob Lake looking like this on the AZT 750 back in April. A lot of the bikepack racers carry insanely light loads, often no sleeping bag or sleeping pad. This guys plan was to ride to exhaustion each night so he'd be able to sleep without a pad. It worked...he finished in under 14 days...

    20160427_213207.jpg



    Hard to say as I've only been up there a couple times. Now *can be* a good time, though downed trees may not have been removed some years, and other years there could still be snow. It was hard to get info on trail conditions. Based on elevation the temps should be ok all summer, but as things warm up monsoon storms will come through more frequently. Parts of the trails would be ok after precip, but some definitely would not. My first trip to Rainbow Rim was early October, and it was primo - 60s during the day but below freezing overnight. We had the place to ourselves but that was some years ago. Fall is my favorite time for high elevation rides, because you get cool temps, more stable weather, aspens turning, and few other people around.
     
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  20. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    See if this works. Edit....nope. Can't get the interactive map to embed but here is a link:

    https://ridewithgps.com/trips/9617604
     
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  21. OTHRider

    OTHRider Well-Known Member

    Name:
    Duke
    Current Bike:
    '14 Giant TCX SLR2 Cross Bike
    Awesome RR - thanks. It is extremely motivating.

    I've been dabbling in light bikepacking but limiting my trips to two days. With a camera, GPS and lights, I'm curious how you handled your power demands - solar, lots of batteries, charging at breakfast in the Village or ???
     
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  22. dstepper

    dstepper Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Dean Stepper
    Current Bike:
    2014 Turner Czar
    Bike packing is all about the water. Kaibab is a dry plateau so water is what the ranchers develop for the range animals....nasty filtered cow pond water with dead birds floating around. Good water filter highly recommended. That is when muddy rain puddles in the road start looking good.
    Either you pre-stage water drops or you plan on hitting town every 2-3 days. Hitting town, getting a bed, a shower, charge GPS lights cell phone and restock food has always been my preference. On that route Jacob Lake, Kaibab Lodge and Grand Hotel are very nice.

    Dean
     
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  23. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    It wasn't a big deal for the most part. I bring a second camera battery, but didn't need it. For lights I brought two batteries. I run them on the lowest setting so they last for 4-5 hours each. The first went dead half way through the 2nd night's ride. The second lasted. I had a camping headlamp as a backup. I have used that on its own for bikepacking too, it works well enough at bikepacking speed and uses AAAs.

    My GPS is a Garmin Oregon which uses AAs. I brought 4 sets and knew I'd need to buy more. For some reason I always have issues with AAs on trips. My normal rechargeables will last for 6-8 hours on day rides, but the moment I set out on a multi-day they last half to 2/3 of that. I knew I'd have to buy more, which I did at the Grand Canyon village. Those didn't do much better and it was touch and go if they would last. I was actually putting spent batteries back in to see if they would go a few miles longer at the end. They did, and the GPS made it to the end. The AZT is on Trailforks so I had my phone as backup for that, no cell coverage needed. It could have got me through on dirt roads too. Lastly I have a delorme Inreach, that I can connect to my phone and view downloaded maps via bluetooth. I have had better luck with Energizer Lithium extended batteries but was out of those. When fresh 2-3 pairs will last for a full week. There would have been options to recharge at the GC Village if need be, but I don't want the delay to wait for charging. Hence I like a GPS that takes AAs.


    Like Dean mentions water is the main concern up there. One way to solve that problem is to start midway on the longest distance between sources, like N end of Rainbow Rim. You start there with full load. Then have Quaking Aspen spring 25 mi later, then ~35mi to GC village. There is a spring along AZT to refill or N Kaibab Lodge. Then 35 mi to Jacob Lake. Or just carry more like I did. Pre-staging is an option too.
     
    mtnbikej, Tom the Bomb, Mikie and 3 others like this.
  24. Oaken

    Oaken Well-Known Member

    Location:
    OC
    Name:
    CeeJay
    Amazing!
    I've read it three times.
     
    Mikie and kioti like this.
  25. kioti

    kioti Well-Known Member

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    "Kinda sketch way to ride. But the dog was stoked, ears dancing in the wind.."
    Could that be a Highway Patrol officer on the right with other ideas?

    My lab's ears are so big he'd just Dumbo right off the tool box.
     
    Mikie and mike like this.
  26. evdog

    evdog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    San diego
    Name:
    Evan S
    Yes that was an AZ highway patrol cruiser or whatever you call the new explorers. Didn't seem to care, if he noticed at all
     
    Mikie, mike and kioti like this.
  27. dstepper

    dstepper Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Laguna Beach
    Name:
    Dean Stepper
    Current Bike:
    2014 Turner Czar
    It is Arizona my bet is people can still ride in the back of trucks legally.

    Dean
     
    Mikie, mike and kioti like this.
  28. CarlS

    CarlS Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Temecula, CA
    Name:
    Carl
    Current Bike:
    Walmart $50 special
    off to big bear.. when I get back I'm going to read this whole thing probably like 10 times. so awesome !!!
     
    Mikie and mike like this.
  29. mike

    mike MTB Addict

    Name:
    Mike O
    FWIW: I also use a GPS that uses AAs, but I don't use it for anything but backup nav. Lithium AAs are spendy, but very light and last longer than alkaline. (You can't mail them; bummer for postal chaches.)

    The first thing I do when stopping anywhere is look for elec outlets. You can almost always find one near restaurant seating or at a market. Some RV CG tent sites have optional electric.

    I also use a small recharge-able charger that's about the size of a deck of cards; it recharges my phone about 2.5 times. It's a great piece of gear; the only issue is that it takes a decent amount of time to charge fully. http://www.monoprice.com/product?c_id=108&cp_id=10831&cs_id=1083110&p_id=9283&seq=1&format=2

    For light, just a headlamp that takes AAAs, never any special bike lights. Never felt the need for more than 200 lumens, including some night travel and early starts. Unless it's a special mission requiring copious night riding, bike-specific lights you can't wear on your head are a waste of time IMO.
     
    mtnbikej and Mikie like this.
  30. kioti

    kioti Well-Known Member

    Name:
    Jim Jennings
    And the beer. :thumbsup:
     

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